Bring Image-Guided Neuraxial Techniques Into Your Nurse Anesthesia Program—At No Cost.

Teach-Accuro® Bring Image-Guided Neuraxial Techniques to Your Students at No Cost.

Academic Medical Centers and Teaching Hospitals Can Easily Integrate the Accuro Image-Guided Neuraxial Technique into the Curriculum.

Ease The Learning Curve

Accuro technology is designed to simplify image interpretation and reduce the learning curve required to implement neuraxial ultrasonography, making Accuro an ideal adjunct for educators.

Proven Clinical Benefits:
• 48% Reduction inneedle redirects*.
• 57% Reduction in needle insertion time*.
• 95% Overall patient satisfaction*.

Clinical evidence demonstrates that the Accuro-guided technique is superior to blind palpation irrespective of provider experience level, type of neuraxial anesthesia performed, and amount of prior training with Accuro*.

Accuro with lumbar mode preset
Product Features

1. SEE more than 5X* enhancement of bone-to-tissue contrast with BoneEnhance® image reconstruction technology.

2. FIND the ideal insertion point with Midline (red dashed line) and Cross Hair indicators.

3. AUTOMATICALLY IDENTIFY epidural location with success rates exceeding 94%* using SpineNav3D technology.

4. MARK needle placement by gently pressing Accuro Locator needle guide against the skin.

Dr. Stephen Garber, Anesthesiologist and Medical Director Obstetric Anesthesiology at Saddleback Medical Center

Accuro utilized during initial L&D consult to locate a significantly compressed intervertebral space.

An Accuro Case Study

Stephen Garber MD
Anesthesiologist, Medical Director Obstetric Anesthesiology
Saddleback Medical Center
Laguna Hills, CA

How Valuable Is the Use of Accuro During an Initial Anesthesia Consult?

Consider the following case study provided by Dr. Stephen Garber, Anesthesiologist and Medical Director Obstetric Anesthesiology at Saddleback Medical Center, who recently met with an expectant mother presenting anatomical challenges concerning an epidural placement.

CASE STUDY

A patient presenting postoperative spinal instrumentation obtained anesthesia consult via her obstetrician at 25-weeks gestation to determine the possibility of an epidural placement during labor. The patient had a traumatic fracture of the L1 vertebrae, suffered during a car accident; the postoperative status showed a right L1 laminectomy and fusion of T11-12 to L2-3. Although the instrumentation ended at L 2-3, a lateral X-ray showed that the spaces below L 2-3 were significantly compressed due to the force and torque of spinal instrumentation (as depicted in Figure 1). Also, palpation was not feasible due to severe chronic pain over the scar and adjacent area.

Accuro located the epidural space (as shown in Figure 2) despite significant compression, which provided the Doctor and patient confidence before the delivery date that an epidural placement was possible. Accuro showed that the patient’s scar was off the midline, which was unusual and posed further obstacles for blind palpation. Accuro facilitated the spinal midline identification and detection of the intervertebral space for a successful epidural placement during labor and delivery; otherwise, the chances for placing a labor epidural would have been significantly diminished.

“As an anesthesiologist performing epidurals and spinals, we’re one of the few specialties not using imaging technology regularly to find the epidural space; this is an advancement that is due in our specialty.”

Figure 1. Postoperative X-ray imaging showed a right L1 laminectomy and fusion of T11-12 to L2-3, with narrowed intervertebral spaces below.

X-ray of patient's back

Figure 2. Accuro facilitated the spinal midline identification and detection of significantly compressed intervertebral space during initial L&D consultation. Accuro showed the scar was off the midline as circled in the image.

Accuro identifies compressed epidural space